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Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Sprints or a Kanban?

There seems to be some confusion that using Sprints or a Kanban is a competition of sorts with "one being better than the other".  Might as well argue whether a hammer is better than a saw.  Anytime someone gives a blanket statement that "one is better than the other" it means they misunderstands both.

Sprints are more suitable to complex problems that a cross-discipline team will swarm on to solve.  Complex work has "unknown unknowns" that require experimentation and defy planning and estimation.  The time-box is a limit of time that is established to touch base with the business side and to replan our next move on a complex mechanic.

A Kanban, a way to visualize a lean flow, is used for complicated work.  Complicated work has "known unknowns", like creating levels and characters for a game with established mechanics.  The variations are manageable. It is more predictable and uses hand-offs of work through a flow.

Using Sprints to manage complicated work results in batched work and an artificial division through sprint planning and review. It hides discipline inefficiencies and leads to split stores which create no value individually. Imagine the cost of buying a house if every one was a custom concept home built by a guild of craftspeople.

Using a Kanban to manage complex work results in turbulent flow that either creates inefficiencies and a lack of transparency or artificial deadlines to call things "done" when they really aren't.  Kanban doesn't handle the back-and-forth of exploration very well. This creates debt and can limit the creative potential of a game. It's why we don't use an assembly line to design a new car.

I often see Kanban used for complex work because there is still an "upfront planning" mindset that thinks a new uncertain game mechanic can be broken down into bite-sized discipline centric steps and pushed though the teams. Sprints are abandoned because the developers cannot be trusted to take larger goals and break down the work as they see fit.

Choose the best tool for the work.  Wielding a hammer with great skill to cut long pieces of wood into smaller ones isn't as useful as using a saw.

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